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(Picture From: Eating To)
(Picture From: Eating To)

Tom Yum Goong

Tom Yum Goong is the national soup of Thailand and mixing it together with the popular Thai Rice Noodles, it becomes a double-hit combo. The quintessential Thai aroma! A bold, refreshing blend of fragrant lemongrass, chilli, galangal, lime leaves, shallots, lime juice and fish sauce shapes this classic soup, giving it its legendary herbal kick. Succulent fresh prawns and straw mushrooms lend it body. A versatile dish that can fit within virtually any meal, the distinctive smell reminds you of exotic perfume, while it’s invigorating sour-spicy-hot taste just screams ‘Thailand’! You can probably find this in many restaurants but the best is at Pee’Aor. Why? The Tom Yum is authentic, rich and creamy at the right level. Prawns used here are huge fresh prawns that is of quality.

(Photo From: Blogspot)
(Photo From: Blogspot)

Braised Pork Rice

I guess this needs no further introduction since it’s now extremely popular and almost every other blogger is blogging about this place. Yes, the one at Pratunam, famous for Braised Pork Trotters Rice and Wanton Noodles. I like the braised pork rice as it’s tender and soft pork boiled in braised sauce makes this dish so delicious. On the other hand, having been here since 15 years back, the standard have definitely dropped and the portion is getting ridiculously small.

(Picture From: Thailand Musang)
(Picture From: Thailand Musang)

Som Tum (Spicy Green Papaya Salad)

Hailing from the Northeast state of Isaan, this outlandish dish is both great divider – some can’t get enough of its bite, some can’t handle it – and greatly distinctive. Garlic, chilies, green beans, cherry tomatoes and shredded raw papaya get dramatically pulverized in a pestle and mortar, so releasing a rounded sweet-sour-spicy flavour that’s not easily forgotten. Regional variations throw peanuts, dry shrimp or salted crab into the mix, the latter having a gut-cleansing talent that catches many newcomers by surprise! This is my favorite ~ It was sweet and sour and a little spicy too. It is a famous food in Thailand you can get it everywhere.

(Picture From: clemson study abroad)
(Picture From: clemson study abroad)

Pad Thai (Thai style Fried Noodles)

Pad Thai is like the national noodle of Thailand because every noodle dish ordered from a Thai Restaurant would be Pad Thai.  It is a street food dish made from stir-fried rice noodles with egg, beansprouts, peanuts, shallots, tofu, prawns and tamarind juice/sauce. Sweet, Spicy, Tangy and extremely delicious.

Stir Fry Minced Chicken with Holy Basil

Pad Krapow Moo Saap (Fried Basil and Pork)

An incredibly popular ‘one plate’ dish for lunch or dinner, fried basil and pork is certainly one of the most popular Thai dishes. It is made in a piping hot wok with lots of holy basil leaves, large fresh chilli, pork, green beans, soy sauce and a little sugar. The minced, fatty pork is oily and mixes with the steamed white rice for a lovely fulfilling meal. It is often topped with a fried egg (kai dao) you will most likely be asked if you would like an egg with it. Be aware that most Thai people ask for lots of chilli in this dish so if you are not a fan of tingling lips, ask for you pad krapow ‘a little spicy’.

(Picture From: So Syok)
(Picture From: So Syok)

Grilled Pork (Moo Ping)

I believe the secret to why so many Thai dishes or street food taste so great is because they make use of traditional charcoal, using the amber and heat to cook the food. The end product of this Moo Ping is sweet, succulent and tender. This particular stall, Moo Ping Hea Owen is recommended by many locals but you can still find good ones around even in Pratunam Market.

(Picture From: Youtube)
(Picture From: Youtube)

Fried Banana Pancake (Roti Gluay)

Thai love Sweet and hence, their Banana Prata is actually also sweeter as it is topped with condensed milk. Don’t like condensed milk, they also have options such as honey, nutella, chocolate, coconut, sugar and much more. Want to add an egg to it, no issue as well. Do lookout for the menu at the food cart and order something to your preference. The final product presented is just so appealing. Light, crispy and delicious.
(Picture From: She Simmers)
(Picture From: She Simmers)

Isaan Sausage (Sai Krok Isaan)

Found in puffs of smoke along Bangkok’s roadsides the barbecue grills are another of the city’s most common street vendors. A variety of meats are often sold at these Bangkok Street Food grills, however few are overly exciting, a lot of rubbery wieners and meats only made better by a hot chilli dipping sauce. There are exceptions however and one is the Isaan sausage which is named after the Northeastern region of Thailand in which it originated. The fermenting of this pork and sticky rice sausage gives it a unique sour taste. Accompanied by galam (cabbage), sliced ginger, and whole chillies for added heat (sometimes lime and peanuts). Roll them together and pop in your mouth for a unique Thai taste. Costs 10 baht per stick (as above) and sometimes comes shaped as rounded balls at Bangkok Street Food.
mango sticky rice

Mango and Sticky (Khao Niao Mamuang)

The best known of Thai desserts and one to make up for the Kingdom’s . While fresh mango alone is delicious enough, when matched with coconut sticky rice, drizzles of coconut syrup and sprinkles of toasted mung beans, the Mango Sticky Rice is unstoppable. Sweet, slightly salty and all round delicious. What perfects Mango Sticky Rice is the balance of salty where the sticky rice base has first been soaked in coconut milk, sugar and salt before steaming in pandan leaves. The freshly cut sweet mango, then placed on top before additions of coconut syrup and mung beans (or occasional sesame seeds). Mango Sticky Rice is best found at food courts and occasionally at Bangkok street food stalls.
(Picture From: Burpple)
(Picture From: Burpple)

Boat Noodles (Kway Teow Rua)

Where can you get traditional Thai Noodles, formerly sold on boats, at just 10 baht (RM 1.20) per bowl? I guarantee you won’t stop at just one bowl as the portion is indeed small. You will see bowls stacked on every table. Come and experience for yourself! The place to get Boat Noodles is at Victory Monument. Which exact outlet? More information in the full post of Boat Noodles! Probably the easiest way to ask for directions is to show the picture to the locals.

 

 

 

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